Make your own free website on Tripod.com

SCV - Col. Robert G. Shaver Camp 1655

Arkansas Civil War Sites

If you know of additional Arkansas sites that can be added or further information or corrections about these sites please let us know.

Bogg's Mill
Brownsville
Buffalo National River
Camp Bragg
Camp Crystal Hill
Camp Jackson
Camp Lee
Camp McIntosh
Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery
Camp Stephens
Camp Walker
Camp White Sulphur
Cane Hill
Center Point
Chalk Bluff
Confederate Saltpeter Mine
Confederate State Capitol
Cross Hollows
Devils Backbone
Ditch Bayou
Eagle Hotel
Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge)
Elkins' Ferry
Elm Springs
Fayetteville Confederate Cemetery
Fort Hindman/Arkansas Post
Fort Smith Historic Site
Fort Southerland and Fort Lookout
Helena
Hurricane Creek
Jacksonport
Jenkins' Ferry
Jonesboro
Marks' Mills
Maysville
McKissick's Spring
Mount Holly Cemetery
Old State House
Pittman's Ferry
Prairie D'Ane Battlefield
Poison Spring Battlefield
Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park
Reed's Bridge
Scatterville Cemetery
St. Charles
United States Arsenal

Bogg's Mill

This site is on private property in Yell County near the town of Mt. George and has not been preserved. The site was formerly a small community and the location of a cavalry skirmish during the war. The 1st Mounted Arkansas Rifles and other units were formed here.

Buffalo National River

Located in the Ozarks region of northern Arkansas. The land is now part of the 95,000 acre national park. Many skirmishes took place in this region during the war and some skirmish sites and war era farms are interpreted along the river. The Buffalo River cuts through the Ozark Mountains for approximately 150 miles and was the nation's first federally protected river. It is known for its spectacular scenery, high bluffs, and great canoeing. The river has recently been added to the Civil War Trust's Civil War Discovery Trail.

Brownsville

Located near the town of Lonoke in Lonoke County. This site is now private property. A historical marker placed by the local historical society is present on the highway near the battlefield. On August 25, 1863, a combined total of approximately 7,000 Federal and Confederate cavalry clashed just east of the town of Brownsville. After a brief artillery duel Colonel Geigers U.S. troopers forced the retreat of General Marmaduke's Confederate forces. General Marmaduke formed new battle lines about 6 miles to the west of the town and repulsed the Union advance. The Confederates withdrew a short time later.

Camp Bragg

Located along the Arkansas River between Fort Smith and Clarksville. Used as winter quarters.

Camp Crystal Hill

Located just northwest of North Little Rock near the suburb of Crystal Hill.

Camp Jackson

Located 4 miles from Maysville, Arkansas.

Camp Lee

Located just across the border in Missouri. 12 miles southwest of Neosho and 6 miles from the Cherokee line.

Camp McIntosh

Near Ozark, Arkansas.

Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery

Located near the town of Old Austin in Lonoke County. Camp Nelson was a staging point for Arkansas and Texas troops early in the war. The Camp was named for General Allison Nelson. In the fall of 1862 an epedimic of typhoid fever and measles swept through the camp killing well over a thousand men, including the General. Approximately 500 of these men are buried at the Confederate Cemetery a few miles south of the old town. Early in the century, veterans marked off the cemetery and the State placed unknown's grave markers and a monument there. The cemetery was neglected and overgrown for many years until the 1980's when local schoolchildren cleared the site. A historical marker is present at the Methodist Church in Old Austin which served as the hospital.

Camp Stephens

Located in Benton county. This Confederate camp was named for Vice President Alexander Stephens. It covered land on the Little Sugar and Brush Creeks, extending eastward 3 miles from their confluence. Brigadier General Bart Pearce established the camp in July 1861 when he moved troops from Camp Walker to train the 3rd Louisiana. After training they moved to Cassville, Missouri on 31 Jul and then on to the fight at Wilson's Creek on 10 Aug. Soon after the battle of Elkhorn Tavern, Union General Curtis moved to this camp to get away from "the stench of the battlefield". Marked by a historical marker.

Camp Walker

Located 3 miles east of Maysville in Benton County on Highway 72. It is marked by a historical marker. The camp was established in June of 1861 by Brigadier General Bart Pearce to train recruits from the Indian Territory and western Arkansas. The training ground covered about 2 square miles. The historical marker is located near the officer's quarters on the ridge next to an old rocked up well used by them. Many Arkansas units, Greer's Texas regiment, and Hebert's 3rd Louisiana all trained here and went from this camp to Camp Stephens before participating in the battle at Wilson's Creek.

Camp White Sulphur

Located on the outskirts of Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

Confederate State Capitol

The State government was moved to this site in Washington, Arkansas by Governor Flanagin after Federal forces had captured Little Rock. The building is now part of Old Washington State Park in Hempstead County and has recently been added to the Civil War Discovery Trail. The site contains the Capitol building and several antebellum homes that are open for tours.

Cane Hill

The battle of Cane Hill was really a series of running battles between Confederate forces under General Thomas Hindman and Union forces under General James Blunt. Hindman planned to flank the Federal forces after a diversion by cavalry under Marmaduke. Blunt, realizing his exposed position called for reinforcements from Springfield. Hindman determined to meet the reinforcements first and deal

Chalk Bluff

Historic plaques and a walking trail illustrate the history of this site in Northeast Arkansas near the town of St. Francis on the St. Francis River. Gen. John S. Marmaduke was forced to fight at this location in May of 1863 in order to ensure a succesful retreat from a raid into Missouri. Several other skirmishes took place at this site during the war.

Center Point

This small Howard county town was held by Confederates throughout the war. It was raided by a carpetbagger militia in 1868 because of its continued Confederate sympathies.

Confederate Saltpeter Mine

Remains of an 1862 saltpeter mine in rural Independence County near the town of Cushman. Saltpeter is used in the creation of gunpowder.

Cross Hollows

One mile east and 1 mile north of Powell on the Old Wire Road. This was General Mculloch's winter quarters for the 10 or 12,000 men in his army. Union General Curtis entered it on 22 Feb 1862 and found it abandoned and burning. Union forces encamped here for approx. 2 weeks until the battle of Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge).

Devil's Backbone

This battlefield in Sebastion County near Jenny Lind is the location of a battle between Confederate Infantry and a larger, mixed Federal force. The three hour battle began with an ambush by Confederate forces in an effort to allow their supply train time to reach safety. The Confederates had the better of the fight until Union forces could organize and bring up their artillery and cavalry. The Confederates tactical objectives had been accomplished, but the losses in men and morale could not be replaced.


Ditch Bayou

Federal troops attacked 600 Confederates under Colonel Colton Greene on June 6, 1864 on this Chicot County battlefield. Outnumbered five to one the Confederates inflicted horrendous casualties on the Federal force and withdrew in good order after ammo ran low. Frustrated by their loss and inability to pursue, Federal troops burned and looted the nearby town of Lake Village. The ditch where the bulk of the fighting took place still exists though most of the rest of the site has changed. Historic marker and display located at nearby Lake Chicot State Park.

Elkhorn Tavern

Elkhorn Tavern was one of the largest battles to take place west of the Mississippi, and the most important in Arkansas. General Earl Van Dorn forced marched his 16,000 men out of winter camp through treacherous terrain and blizzard conditions into the rear of the encamped Union army, leaving most of their supply train out of range. Before a decisive blow could be struck Union forces changed their facing to meet the attack. Van Dorn unwisely split his army in the face of the enemy and the right wing of his army fell apart when the three ranking officers were killed. This spelled doom for the Army of the West. After fierce fighting Confederate ammunition ran low and the army was forced to leave the enemy in control of the field. This battle ended any hope of retaining Missouri for the Confederacy. Van Dorn abandoned the State soon after. The battlefield is well preserved and can be viewed via a driving tour. The visitors center and museum overlooks the battlefield. Located in Benton County.

Eagle Hotel

Located one block west of the square in Bentonville (Benton County). Union General Franz Sigel had remained here with 600 men and a battery of 6 pieces after the main column of his army had passed through on its way to camp on Sugar Creek. Confederate troops under Van Dorn surprised him while he was eating his breakfast in the hotel and forced a hasty retreat. In 1887 Sigel returned to retrace his route and remarked that he had returned to finish his breakfast. The hotel was later gutted by fire but was later restored by Mr. Sam Walton.

Elkins' Ferry battlefield

This battlefield is private property and remains heavily forested. The battle was fought during a heavy hailstorm. Confederate forces were forced to move elsewhere after Federal artillery knocked over a large number of beehives.

Elm Springs

The encampment of Van Dorn's Army before the battle of Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). Located 4 miles north of Tontitown in Benton county on Highway 112. Marked by historical marker.

Fayetteville Confederate Cemetery

The Southern Memorial Association of Washington County established this cemetery in 1872. Confederate dead were removed from area battlefields at the associations expense and moved to this location on East Mountain in Fayetteville.

Fort Hindman/Arkansas Post

Location of the first settlement in Arkansas. Confederate forces constructed a fort at this location to guard the lower reaches of the Arkansas River. It was garrisoned by 3,000 Confederates, primarily Texas and Arkansas troops under the command of Brig. Gen. Thomas Churchill. Approximately 33,000 Union Infantry and Cavalry along with about 40 pieces of artillery, 3 ironclads, and an assortment of other gunboats, attacked the fort and town. The defenders repulsed the first assault but surrendered as a final fatal attack was forming. The fort itself now lies under a lake where the river formerly ran, though entrenchments remain. The museum on the site details the battle as well as the history of the post during French and Spanish control and its importance during the territorial era. It is located in Arkansas County south of DeWitt.

Fort Smith

Seized by Confederate troops in 1861 and not recaptured until 1863. Fort Smith was an important objective for both sides and was an important opening into the Indian territory. The historic site is open to visitors. The National Cemetery contains both Union and Confederate graves, including three Confederate Generals. Recently added to the Civil War Discovery Trail.

Fort Southerland and Fort Lookout

Located in Camden, these forts are part of a series of fortifications started by Confederate troops for the protection of Camden. Federal troops improved the forts during their occupation. Fort Southerland is open to the public while Fort Lookout remains on private land.

Helena

A major engagement that occurred on the same day as the retreat from Gettysburg and the fall of Vicksburg. Confederate forces launched a three pronged assault on entrenched Federals occupying the town an supported by gunboats. One of the attacks reached its objective but did not receive necessary support. Union General Prentiss remarked that the assaults on the town exhibited "a courage and desperation rarely equaled." Historical markers throughout the city describe the battle. Helena cemetery is also worth a visit as it is the final resting place of General Patrick Cleburne, a Helena resident. Recently added to the Civil War Trust's Civil War Discovery Trail

Hurricane Creek

After the fall of Little Rock to Union forces in September of 1863. The area immediately south of the Arkansas River was a no-mans land. On 23 Oct 1864, a Federal detachment of the 7th Army Corps was returning to Little Rock after a raid on the Confederate Arsenal at Princeton and were engaged by Logan's 11th Arkansas Cavalry. 28 men were reported killed along with 11 wounded and 1 captured. Located in Saline county, the site is marked by a historical marker.

Jacksonport

Located on Arkansas 69 north of Newport. This was a strategically important site that changed hands several times during the war, It is the site of General Jeff Thompson's surrender of Arkansas forces in 1865. The Jackson Guards formed there in 1861 and 1865. Exihibits are presented inside the restored 1869 courthouse, and a White River paddlewheeler, the Mary Woods II, is open to the public. This site served as headquarters for several Generals, including General Marmaduke. A Confederate Monument is located on the courthouse grounds. Recently added to the Civil War Trust's Civil War Discovery Trail.

Jenkins Ferry

Federal forces were retreating back towards Little Rock from Camden in rainy, muddy, and foggy conditions on April 30, 1864 when they were attacked by Confederate forces under General Kirby Smith. Confusion and conditions on the field favored the defender and the Confederates retreated to the bluffs they had charged from. The Federal retreat towards Little Rock continued. Located in Grant County on Highway 64. The battle is detailed at a State Park.

Jonesboro

This small 1863 battle took place at the Craighead County Courthouse in Jonesboro. It seems that Company D of the 1st Wisconsin Infantry captured several Confederate soldiers just south of the town. These soldiers were taken to the Courthouse and the Federals ensconced themselves in the courthouse and neighboring buildings. An Arkansas unit under the command of Captain Adair learned of the capture and resolved to retake the town and rescue the prisoners. Witnesses states that the Confederates attacked from woods on the west side of the courthouse and after a spirited fight drove the Federals from the buildings and forced them to abandon the town. 2 Confederates were killed in the fight and approximately 7 Federals were killed. Camp 1655 members continue to research this battle.

Marks' Mills

Located at the intersection of Highways 8 and 97 in Cleveland County. This is the location of an ambush by Confederate Cavalry against a Federal supply train of over 200 wagons, commanded by future reconstruction Governor Powell Clayton, headed towards Pine Bluff to pick up supplies. The attack began as a straight up fight until General Shelby's cavalry arrived on the Federal flank which finally ended in a Federal surrender. The future Governor Powell managed to flee with a small cavalry escort. The outcome of this battle forced Federal General Steele to abandon southern Arkansas and start an arduous and dangerous retreat back to Little Rock. The battle is detailed at a State Park.

Maysville

Located in Benton county west of Gravette. Union General James Blunt was encamped on the old Pea Ridge battlefield. General Douglas H. Cooper and Colonel Stand Watie's Indian Regiment were at old Fort Wayne just across the Indian Territory line from Maysville. On 20 Oct 1862, Blunt advanced his 2nd and 3rd brigades to Bentonville, and on 21 Oct to Maysville. Crossing the prairie they found the Confederates lined up on the edge of some timber a quarter mile from the town. Blunt attacked and against his superior force retreated in disorder for some 7 miles followed by the 6th Kansas and 3rd Cherokee (Union).

Camp McKissick's Spring

1 block south and 1 block west of Centerton City Hall in Benton county. 1st and 2nd Divisions of the Federal Army were encamped here just prior to the battle of Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge).

Old State House

The most famous building in Arkansas was the seat of Arkansas' government until the fall of Little Rock when it was moved to Washington. It was the site of the secession convention that took the State out of the Union. The site was made famous during the Presidential campaign of 1992 when it served as a backdrop for President Clinton's campaign. It contains a museum dedicated to Arkansas history. The Arkansas Territorial Restoration is nearby and is an excellent look at Arkansas' frontier and territorial days.

Pittman's Ferry

Located in Randolph county along the Current River, it has been the site of a ferry since 1803. During the war it was on the major route from St. Louis to Texas and Mexico. The gateway into Arkansas along the Southwest Trail. It was used by both Northern and Southern forces as well as lawless bushwackers during the war. Union and Confederate troops engaged here on 20 Jul, 27 Oct, and 25 Nov 1862. In 1861 it was the headquarters of the Confederate Military District of Northern Arkansas commanded by General William J. Hardee. It is located near Rees Grocery on Hwy. 166.

Poison Spring Battlefield

On highway 76 near Chidester in Ouachita County. In April 1864 Confederate troops attacked and decimated a Union Supply train taking supplies to Camden. Heavy losses were sustained by the First Kansas Colored Regiment (Federal) during the battle and due to this the battle is a controversial one. There has been some debate regarding the content of interpretive plaques at the site.

Prairie D'Ane Battlefield

Located at Prescott in Nevada County, most of it is still pasture land and is all private property. Visitors cand learn about the battle at a museum in Prescott.

Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park

This battle was fought on December 7, 1862. The battle began with a two-hour artillery barrage by Federal troops against the Confederates on the high ground. The Federal commander thought the Confederates were finished and ordered a small force forward. The attacking Federals were overwhelmed as they climbed the hill. The Southern troops saw their chance and pressed the attack. As the attack got under way Federal reinforcements under General Blunt arrived on the scene, having "marched to the sound of the guns". Confederate forces were forced to withdraw in order. Combined dead was approximately 2500 in this brutal fight. The main part of the battlefield is now a State park, efforts are underway to acquire more land at this time. Located in Washington County. Other link: City of Prairie Grove

Mount Holly Cemetery

Situated in Little Rock's Historic Quapaw Quarter this beautiful old cemetery is the burial place of executed boy-hero David O. Dodd and 5 Confederate Generals. Other notables interred here are several Arkansas governors, the painter of "The Arkansaw Traveller", and the writer of the song of the same name. A yearly ceremony is held here to honor young Dodd.

Reed's Bridge

On August 27, 1863 the Federal Army was advancing along the military road toward Little Rock when its cavalry division of 6,000 under General John Davidson attempted a crossing at Reed's Bridge just outside of Jacksonville, AR. Here it was met by a Confederate force of 4,000 under General John S. Marmaduke. After burning the bridge the Confederates defended the crossing under heavy fire throughout the day. Several Federal attempts at crossing failed and the Federals withdrew at sunset. Two days later they crossed the bayou 5 miles to the south and continued the advance on Little Rock, which would fall on September 10th. The site has not been protected and is on private property. It is identified by a historical marker put up there in 1970 by the local Jaycees. It is on highway 161 just outside of town.

Scatterville Cemetery

Scatterville was an early settlement, located in present day Clay county near Rector, on the old military road which connected Chalk Bluff with Gainesville. Civil War skirmishes were fought here on 3 Aug 1862 and 28 Mar 1863.

St. Charles

Site of "the deadliest shot of the Civil War". It has changed considerably in the intervening years and has not been preserved. The position of the Confederate batteries is now covered by a grain silo. A historical marker located near the White River and a monument in the town to honor the Union sailors and Confederate soldiers who died here. More than 100 Union sailors were scalded to death inside the ironclad U.S.S Mound City when an artillery round penetrated its steam drum. Only 26 crewmen escaped. Other Federal forces seized the fort by land but it was a very costly victory.

United States Arsenal

1840 building located in MacArthur Park in downtown Little Rock. Was surrendered to Governor Rector in February 1861 by its Union garrison. General Patrick Cleburne commanded some of the Arkansas troops that forced the surrender. It was used as an arsenal and hospital by Confederate forces until the fall of Little Rock. This building is also the birthplace of General Douglas MacArthur. It is reported to be the most "haunted" building in Arkansas with numerous citings of apparitions. For the moment it houses the Arkansas Museum of Science and History, but they will be moving to a new location soon. Some thought has been given to establishing a Civil War Museum in the building but no plans have been finalized.


This web page authored by Mark Gerdes.
Last updated March 1, 1997. Page and all contents Copyrightę 1996, 1997 by SCV Camp #1655, Jonesboro, Arkansas.